Sassy Southern Cooking with a French Twist

recipes

Exciting News and Wonderful Veal Stew for Warming Fall Nights

Hello again from my “old” post at hollyherrick.com. After a few months away at The Permanent Tourist Charleston, I’ve decided to return “home” and put a new polish on my old site.

In the coming weeks, I’ll be working on a cleaner, more visual look, more widgets to connect with bloglovin’ and other new places, adding cooking classes and recipe development pages, new recipes from my personal, unpublished recipe file, restaurant and Charleston cooking/food news, and of course, cookbook giveaways.

In fact, when we launch with the new live pages from the wonderful folks at Charleston Public Relations & Design in a few short weeks, I’ll be giving away a cookbook trifecta – three signed copies from The French Cook series including Sauces, Cream Puffs and Soups & Stews…nearly a $100 value just in time for the holidays. So, you’ll want to keep your eyes open for that and tell your friends about it, too. It’s easy to subscribe on the home page here if they want regular emails of new posts.

In the meantime, to follow is a fantastically fragrant and easy to prepare stew prepared with veal, apples and sage – the flavors of fall.  Snow is literally already on the way for some of this weekend. Time to pull out your favorite braising pot and get cooking. If you like, substitute veal for pork.

Daube de Veau et Pomme à l a Sauge

Veal , Apple , and Sage Stew

(Makes 6 servings)

From a culinary standpoint, the Normandy region of France is known for two things: apples from its myriad orchards (thus cider and Calvados, an apple brandy) and dairy (thus cream and cheese) from its celebrated cows. It is a large and exquisite region, decorated with a quilt of hedged emerald-green fields, usually damp from a recent rain, with cattle almost incessantly mooing at a low, pleasing hum. This stew combines the sweet tartness of fresh cider and Granny Smith apples with the milky mildness of veal. Sage provides an earthy counterpoint that is just right, especially when finished with a splash of cream. Because the cider is such a big part of the stew, fresh is what you need and the best you can find.

Veal and Apple stew

(Beautiful photo by Chia Chong with Libbie Summers)

Recipe:

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 1⁄2 pounds veal shoulder cut into 2-inch cubes

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 medium onion, finely chopped

4 cloves garlic, smashed and chopped

2 ribs celery, finely chopped

1 tablespoon dry rubbed or ground sage

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 1⁄2 cups best-quality fresh apple cider

2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and cut into

1-inch cubes

1 1⁄2 cups beef or veal stock

1⁄3 cup whole cream or crème fraîche

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage, for garnish

Melt the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat in a 5 1⁄ 2-quart Dutch oven or similarly sized pot. Meanwhile, pat the veal dry and season generously on all sides with salt and pepper. When the oil is just sizzling, arrange about half the veal in a single layer in the bottom of the pan; do not overcrowd. Cook until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Turn and repeat on the second side.

Remove the meat from the pan and reserve nearby. Repeat with remaining veal.

Reduce heat to medium-low. Add the onion, garlic, celery, sage, and a light sprinkle of salt and pepper. Stir to coat and cook for 5 minutes, or until just starting to soften. Return the reserved veal and any juices to the pot. Sprinkle the flour over the meat and vegetables, stirring to coat, and cook for 1 minute. Deglaze by adding the cider, stirring up any brown bits on the bottom or side of the pot. Bring to a boil over high heat and allow the cider to cook off and reduce for about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and establish a very gentle simmer. Add the apples and stock. Cook uncovered, continuing at a gentle simmer, until the veal is very tender, about 1 1⁄ 2 hours. Taste, and adjust seasoning as needed. (Note: You can stop here, allow to cool, and refrigerate overnight.) Add the cream or créme fraîche (no other substitutes here, or it will curdle) and fresh sage at the last minute. Heat through and serve. This is delicious over rice or broad noodles.

Bon appetit!

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Soup Season is Coming!

You don’t want to miss out an all of the bounty soup provides – long, slow simmering, delicious aromas, and incredible tasting food.  Here’s a beautiful recipe for shrimp bisque from today’s post and my soon-to-be-released new book:

http://charleston.thepermanenttourist.com/shrimp-bisque-beauty/

Luscious crab bisque recipe from The French Cook - Soups and Stews (Gibbs Smith, Sept. 1, 2014). Photo by Chia Chong.

Luscious crab bisque recipe from The French Cook – Soups and Stews (Gibbs Smith, Sept. 1, 2014). Photo by Chia Chong.

Bon appetit!

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HoM Sweet HoM and a Book GiveAway

In search of some of the best burgers in town? Look no further. Here’s the beef from yesterday’s Charleston Permanent Tourist blog:

http://charleston.thepermanenttourist.com/hom-ward-burger-bound/

HoM is the place to be – here’s why:

The Big Mac n' Cheese from HoM.

The Big Mac n’ Cheese from HoM.

Remember, The French Cook – Soups & Stews (Gibbs Smith) by yours truly officially releases in just two weeks on September 1. Read more about the book here by clicking on the chartreuse book cover on my revolving books file on the home page to this website or look for it on Amazon where it is currently available for pre-order. It’s a beautiful book and I think my favorite of my seven cookbooks so far – delicious recipes, gorgeous photography, good, concise writing and beautiful formatting.

Write me here and tell me why you would like a signed copy from me. I’ll select a winner and announce him/her on release day, September 1. Good luck and as always happy and delicious cooking.

The French Cook-Soups and StewsBon appetit!

 

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Shrimp, Collards & Grits

I recently came across this beautiful, just-released cookbook by Pat Branning. Actually, Pat a friend and neighbor down in Beaufort was kind enough to send me a signed copy for review.

Shrimp, Collards & Grits by Pat Branning. Cover Art by Ray Ellis.

Shrimp, Collards & Grits by Pat Branning. Cover Art by Ray Ellis.

 

To read about it, please click on this link. Enjoy. It’s a beauty and chock full of luscious art, recipes and writing.

http://charleston.thepermanenttourist.com/for-the-love-of-the-lowcountry/

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Charleston Farmers Market Tour and Cooking with Holly

I am pleased to announce the first in a series of farmers market tours and cooking classes I will be conducting throughout the year at Charleston’s downtown farmers market. We’ll begin at the market early on Saturday mornings and come to my kitchen to cook from what’s inspired me and a group of just six students and finish up the day with a delicious three course meal at my table.

The fruits of summer season on display at Charleston Farmers Market.

The fruits of summer season on display at Charleston Farmers Market.

More details and registration information are provided in this link from yesterday’s post at The Permanent Tourist Charleston.

http://charleston.thepermanenttourist.com/new-farmers-market-tour-with-me-the-permanent-tourist-charleston/

Please feel free to follow me directly there and on facebook at facebook.com/tptcharleston and twitter:@tptcharleston

Happy cooking!

Holly

 

 

 

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